STUDY LOOKS INTO MIGRANTS AND THE LABOR MARKET

THE SURVEY WAS CARRIED OUT BY THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR MIGRATION STUDIES OF THE UNIVERSIDAD DE TALCA.



March 17, 2017

To inquire into the adaptation process to the labor market of the immigrants in Chile and to analyze the factors that influence it were reviewed the third survey conducted by the National Center for Migration Studies, of our Corporation.
 
In presenting the results of the survey - applied in the counties of Santiago Centro, Estación Central, Independencia and Recoleta to persons 18 or older with at least one year of residence in Chile and with labor experience in the country - the director of the Center, Medardo Aguirre, stated that the idea was to determine whether or not there was any type of discrimination in employment.
 
 
"And the truth is that the figures are alarming, because a high percentage (58.1%) feels that people of their same nationality are discriminated against when looking for jobs", he said during the conference held on the premises of the School of Graduate Studies and Extension Center in Santiago.
 
He added that, in this segment, the most affected are Haitians (81%) and Colombians (72.3%), while a little farther, but with similar high percentages, were Venezuelans (47.5%) and Peruvians (46.7%).
 
 
With regard to these differences, Aguirre said that the explanation may be related to the time of permanence in the country. "The people who have been less time in Chile are those who feel more discriminated against when seeking a job. This we somehow initially associated it with what happens with Haitians and Colombians, who are newer compared to the others," he said.
 
 EDUCATIONAL LEVEL
 
 
Aguirre pointed out that another factor that influences the job search is the educational level. "We saw that the feeling of discrimination has to do with the level of education. Those who were less educated feel more discriminated against when seeking work than those who have more studies. It also has to do with the level of income, those with lower income feel more discriminated against, compared with those who have more income," he said.
 
 
With regard to the main activity of immigrants in Chile, most stated that is is for work (81.6%), followed by the work and study item (8.6%); looking for a job (4%), study (1.5%); housework (2.0%), while only 2.3% said to be without activity.
 
Concerning the type of occupation of their activities, 77.5% do so as an employee/worker; 12.8% are self-employed, 7.8% do domestic services; and the 1.8% are employers.
 
When observing the type of contract under which they perform these activities, 55.9% is undefined, 35.6% are temporary contracts and 8.5% has no written contract. According to the study, 64.7 per cent of foreigners in Chile work less than 45 hours a week and 35.3% work more than 45 hours a week.
The main sectors in which they work are the services sector (30.5%); trade (29.7%); construction (10.8%); hotel and restaurant industry(8.7%); professionals and technicians (8.2%); housework service (7.1 per cent).
 
 
In this context, the academic dismissed the myth that these people arrive in the country to "take away the work from the Chileans."
 
 
"The amount of resident foreigners in Chile (2.7%) is still too small for this to have any impact on the labor market," said Medardo Aguirre.



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