EXHIBITORS OF THE VENICE BIENNALE DEBATED IN ARCHITECTURE SEMINAR

GUESTS FROM LATIN AMERICA PRESENTED THEIR IDEAS IN THE VERSION NUMBER 11 OF THE "FROM THE TERRITORY TO THE DETAIL" SEMINAR. THEY CONTINUED IN THIS SPACE THE EXCHANGE OF IDEAS THAT BEGAN IN THE ITALIAN EXHIBITION.



September 28, 2017

The presence of Latin American exhibitors of the 2016Venice Biennale marked the development of the 11th "From the Territory to the Detail" Seminar organized by the School of Architecture as a space for academic reflection with renowned architects who alternate their professional exercise with the teaching activity.
 
 
On this occasion assisted Martin Huberman, Argentina; Michael Fascioli, from Uruguay; Jean Pierre Crousse from Peru; David Barragan and Esteban Benavides, from Ecuador, who shared in the Venice Biennale with the team from the University of Talca, headed by the dean of the Faculty of Architecture, Music and Design, Juan Roman, curator of the Chilean pavilion.
 
 
The director of the seminar, German Valenzuela, expressed that this activity has a vocation academic mainly and brings together architects that are linked to their profession, but also to research and technological development. "In this case, we have invited architects who took part in the last Venice Biennial, given the interest that their work has in academic terms, which may be a significant contribution to what we do in the School." He added that there are many similarities in the view of the development of the region in architectural and cultural terms with postulates that emerge from other countries.
 
 
"The intention to open the discussion to the Latin American context also allows that our ideas are discussed in other places," commented Professor Valenzuela. At the same time, he highlighted that in 11 years this international seminar has brought together more than 30 guests and now it presents a review of the first 10 years and an approach to the future as a more open activity to other disciplines such as design, the arts and music. "When these areas are integrated, there are projects that we had never imagined," he said.
 
 
The foreign guests got to know 17 of the nearly 600 small-scale works built by the School, "which are raised from an idea of local territorial identity, but also of a contemporary cultural form to occupy the territory", according to Valenzuela.
 
 
"As a School we have contributed greatly in this direction, rethinking the places, some more successful than others," he said.
 
Locally

Martin Huberman, architect and also designer and professor, director of the experimental space Studio Apartment of Buenos Aires, talked on the integration of disciplines and the cultural role of these in relation to what happens in the territory. He stressed that our University "is a milestone in the generation of cultural content from the workshops of projects" and added that ten years ago heard it for the first time of its School of Architecture. "For us, it is an example of how to generate the link between design and construction that, in the academic field, is not so traditional. From what we saw, it is amazing the amount of projects," he said.
 
 
Huberman was of the opinion that a better architectural culture can dramatically improve the lives of people, both with or without resources.
 
 
On the 2016 Biennial, he said it is one of the first cured by a Latin American and allowed to exhibit a large part of the local experiences in an international context.
 
 
David Barragán, from the Al Borde workshop from Ecuador, said that coming to the UTALCA "has a fairly high value because there is a lot of similarity with our thought processes. The School here develops an academic project for a locality and is closely related to what we're looking for," he said.
 
 
Sustainability
 
 
Esteban Benavides, who is part of the same team of architects, explained that the relationship with the territory is based on the particularities that are found in the place, with their materials and technologies. "For us, the question of sustainability goes through a logic and a sense of the immediate that is also quite common in vernacular architecture or ancestral regions, but with a sense of contemporary life," he noted.
 
 
Jean Pierre Crousse, curator of the Peruvian Pavilion at the Biennale together with Sandra Barclay, released a school construction project in the Amazon region of the country, with a conception of the territory that not only considers the exploitation of resources, but the place as inhabited space. "The purpose is to empower native populations for that on the basis of their knowledge, incorporating the Amazon as a producing region. They know how to do this with the standing forest, distinct from the western view over the territory, that is the extraction of resources and for which it is necessary to cut down the forest," he said.
 
 
This proposal goes beyond the construction of infrastructure and includes a curriculum reform that involves teaching the grammar of 42 native languages.



PROJECT ABOUT CARIGNAN VARIETY GENERATES NEW PRODUCTS


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMISTS ANALYZED THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE
MORPHOLOGY LABORATORY IS ONE OF THE MOST ADVANCED IN THE COUNTRY
ARCHIVE